Loading...
Art
Françoise Grossen Selects
February 2017
S M T W T F S
1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728
March 2017
S M T W T F S
1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031
April 2017
S M T W T F S
1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30
Oct 18, 2016 - Mar 15, 2017
2 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
212-299-7777
Nearest Subways
A,B,C,D,1 at 59 St-Columbus Circle
N,Q,R at 57 St-7 Av
F at 57 St
1 at 66 St-Lincoln Center
N,Q,R at 49 St
In the 1960s, Françoise Grossen rejected the rectilinear loom that constrained contemporary weaving for an intuitive approach to fiber that resulted in the creation of large-scale, suspended rope forms constructed of knots, loops, braids, and twists. At the time, fiber was still associated with utility or ornament rather than fine art, and Grossen's freehand, three-dimensional handling of the medium was considered a revolutionary gesture that upset the traditional hierarchy subordinating craft to art. A number of other artists in the 1960s and 1970s, including Eva Hesse, Sheila Hicks, and Magdalena Abakanowicz, also began working with fiber in innovative ways, and they shared Grossen's interest in the process of making and the desire for unmediated contact with everyday materials such as rope, string, cord, and twine. As part of MAD's POV series, Grossen has mined the Museum's permanent collection and brought her own rope sculptures together with a selection of work from MAD's unusual collection of baskets, as well as other work in fiber, wood, and metal. Privileging elemental methods of construction as a language of abstraction, Grossen's selections highlight an approach to contemporary sculpture that focuses on the artist's direct transformation of material and links it to a wider discussion about ways of making in culture at large.
mt